The first mobile phone I ever owned was a Nokia 1611.

It did have a display, so it was possible to compose text messages and see incoming phone numbers, but that was about it. Still, it had enough features to become a daily companion.

When my history teacher, Sören Lokrantz, caught me texting during his class, he taught me a valuable life lesson. He asked me:

Teacher: “Do you know what made slaves into slaves?”
Me: “Eh …?”
Teacher: “The fact that they were permanently available.”

Ever since that day, I try to be mindful of how I adapt to new technologies. One example of this ought to be my unorthodox phone policy.

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Jerry Silfwervirtual officeechristensen42DoktorSpinnSkrymta Recent comment authors

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virtual office
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virtual office

This must be epic if you still have this in your pockets. But this isn’t a thing to ashamed with.  Nokia low tech phones are the one we all had since the evolution of mobile phones started.

echristensen42
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echristensen42

@DoktorSpinn Link doesn’t work. and I would love to see it.

DoktorSpinn
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DoktorSpinn

Sorry about that, @echristensen42 – here goes: http://t.co/2VyovDQJ

echristensen42
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echristensen42

My very first very heavy mobile phon #Motorola888 http://t.co/7FQgaDIu @DoktorSpinn

Skrymta
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Not only did I google the Nokia 8210 picture, I made a graph too: http://www.skrymta.se/index.php/2011/06/08/allt-tyngre-kommunikationsmojligheter/

rutberg
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rutberg

I started with the Nokia 1610. I thought that the 1611 was so cool because the possibility to use a solar powered battery to prolong the 30 minutes of talk time :)