My no. 1 career advice for young public relations professionals is simple:

Learn how to write well, and how to write well fast.

Learn online writing, press release writing, interactive copywriting, SEO writing, sales copywriting, case study writing, article writing, social media updates, etc.

Being a solid (and fast!) PR writer will be invaluable both to you and to others. It’ll be the cornerstone of your PR career, even.

Here’s why (and how):

Writing: The No. 1 Communication Skill to Have

Putting things into words is a valuable PR skill. If you know how to write, then there will always be something important for you to do:

Getting brilliant people into a room is one thing. Synthesizing what the heck they’re talking about is equally important.

Creatives will feel good about themselves when they see their crazy ideas coherently presented; readers will understand what’s going on; your team members will ask you to do more of that thing that you do so well — again and again.

You don’t need a lot of industry-specific experience, either. You could just listen and ask questions on behalf of the potential readers, and with them in mind, put it together.

And since you’re a solid writer, you don’t string the words together; you also make those words sing.

PR Writing: Why Speed is Your Edge

If you combine solid writing with speed, then there will be nothing stopping you. But how do you get faster at writing? Most people make the mistake of thinking too much about each and every word. They carefully build sentence after sentence, slowly.

You should take another approach:

Get the first draft down, fast. Never worry about the details; that’s what the second and third draft is for.

What’s important is to keep going without stopping!

First Drafts Should Never Be Perfect

So you start writing, and you push yourself to write fast1. Will your writing then be perfect, you wonder?

No, it won’t. And that’s fine.

In the words of Ernest Hemingway:

“The first draft of anything is shit.”

Revising is best done afterward. Also, lots of people can go into a draft and suggest improvements once there’s an actual text to work with.

Now, I’m not trying to be mean to copyeditors or proofreaders. Their job is important. However, they depend on someone being brave enough to tackle that empty document.

As soon as you start to excel at writing fast, you’ll become a member of a small but well-respected club of PR writers.

Those who understand the worth of your skill will keep you close. Those who don’t will try to jump in, add or remove a few words here and there — and that’s fine, too.

5 Ways to Improve Your PR Writing Skills

I suggest these considerations for anyone aspiring to become a great PR writer:

1. Write in stream-of-consciousness mode.

Don’t stop, finish your piece. You can always go back and take care of any details later.

2. Don’t try to finish your text in one attempt.

Even experienced writers are expecting to do countless of revisions, so don’t try to write a perfect text directly.

3. Keep a notepad beside you when writing.

Unsure about how to spell a particular word? Or do you need to double-check a source? Add a note and fix it later.

4. Start a “sandbox blog” and hone your skills.

For instance, I use this blog to practice writing in English2. Since people can see all my mistakes, it pushes me to improve.

5. Take pride in your work and have fun.

Don’t let any editor put you down. Good editors make you a better writer without making you feel bad about yourself.

---------------------

  1. Personally, I like to hammer my poor keyboard hard, just to show who’s boss.
  2. I’m a Swede, so I’ll probably never be as good writing in English as I am writing in Swedish, but practice helps.