How to write a blogger outreach email? 

Is there a science to it?

Well, I don’t recommend using ready-to-go scripts. As a blogger, somehow you can always feel when someone’s pitching you cold with a generic copy&paste template. It’s a lot of work, but I recommend you write individual emails. It’s worth the effort.

However, a little structure is often a good idea.

Here goes:

Blogger Outreach Email Components

I have this basic public relations checklist for when I write blogger outreach emails. I don’t use it to be sly or in any way to automate my writing, but I use just to make sure I don’t miss any essential parts.

Note: Remember, before you send your pitch, you need to do a Honeymoon Outreach!

These are the components I strive to include:

(Always Include) Honesty

I make sure to express honesty. Saying something nice about another person’s work is the polite thing to do, and if I can’t think of anything honest to say, then I really shouldn’t be pitching that particular blogger.

(Always Include) Purpose

I try to state my purpose in one sentence pretty early on. No superlatives here — I try to keep it plain and descriptive.

(Always Include) Incentive

What’s in it for the blogger? The incentive is the most crucial part, but strangely also the most often forgotten one. I make sure to be clear about the details here.

(Always Include) Recognition

There’s a reason I’m contacting the blogger, we both know that. Therefore, I think it’s important that I, who initiated the contact, also acknowledges the blogger.

(Always Include) Call-To-Action

Many try to soft sell, hoping that the blogger will know what to do without it stating it explicitly. As if that would make the pitch less “salesy”? No, I strive to be clear about what I’m asking of the blogger.

Blogger Outreach Email Examples

This is a made-up example of how I would pitch a blogger writing about interior design:

write blogger outreach email 1

If you include these five elements, and you strive to keep each part down to one or two sentences, you should be able to cover the basics.

Some prefer to write even shorter pitch emails, but I think you might run a risk coming off as way too blasé if you take that approach to far.

These elements can appear in any order, see for example this follow-up email example:

Blogger Outreach Follow-Up Example

Here’s another made-up example of how I would do a follow-up outreach to the same blogger:

write blogger outreach email 2

I try to stay true to my tonality and pitching style. I don’t try to imitate anyone or write as if I were younger or older than I am because I think it’s important to pitch with integrity.

However, I do mix it up quite a bit on the scale between formal and informal. In some cases, I’m simply “all business” and in other a lot more personal — depending on the context.

Good luck and please share your experiences in the comments!