Menu

Reading time: 2 minutes

How often should you post to your Facebook page? Actually, it's not a fixed number, but more of an algorithmic wave-ride.

by JERRY SILVER // Twitter, Facebook, Instagram
Digital PR specialist and CEO at Spin Factory

“How often should I post to my Facebook page?”

That’s one of the most common questions I get about Facebook marketing these days.

The puritans will probably say something along the lines with, “if you don’t have anything to say, don’t say anything.”

Unfortunately, it doesn’t really work that way. Even if we sometimes relate to corporations as if they were humanoids, they are simply the sum of organized structures.

The trick is, rather, to ride the algorithmic wave.

Here’s how:

The EdgeRank Algorithm

EdgeRank determines basically the visibility of your corporate post. EdgeRank is somewhat mysterious and only Facebook knows exactly how it works, but at least we can understand the pillars of this algorithm. And this alone gives you a pretty good hint of often to post.

Here are some key EdgeRank factors:

Time: The older a post gets, the less visible it will become. This means that you need to find out what types of updates that works best when. And you need to this per market; cultural differences and time-zones will otherwise kill your EdgeRank status.

Affinity: If a person has interacted with your corporate Facebook Page before, your messaging will be much more likely to reach them. Ideally, if you’re posting content that’s relevant for your target audience, you can get more and more interaction with each update.

Velocity: How fast a social object (i.e. corporate post) is gaining traction amongst the fan base will assist EdgeRank in deciding how many to show your message to. If you have 400 and Facebook pushes this message to 40 people and 30 of these reacts in some way, then you can be pretty sure that the algorithm will do its best to push it to another bunch of people in your fan base. Something to think about if you’re trying to get a lot of fans without a solid content strategy to back this up.

Importance: I’m pretty sure that you automatically (but temporarily) are given a better EdgeRank on the day of your birthday. This is Facebook guessing from statistics that this is very interesting to your friends. I’m also pretty sure that some words within your update affect your posts’ EdgeRank and there are probably these kinds of factors weighing in for your corporate Facebook Page as well.

Finding Your Sweet Spot

If your Facebook Page update sparks X reactions, the users’ reactions might be visible to Y percent of their friends (here the EdgeRank comes into play again!). If Y is converting well enough, it will add to the X reactions continuously until time T finally kills it off completely.

How Often to Post on Facebook

1. If you’re getting lots of reactions on your updates, it makes sense to update more often. Now EdgeRank work in your favor.

2. If you’re not getting a lot of reactions, you should consider publishing less often. Focus instead on quality and work your way onto “the wave.”

 

Facebook page updates

Ride the algorithmic wave.

How do you schedule Facebook updates? Please let me know in the comment section.

Never miss a Doctor Spin article again?

Join 4,100+ of the best people on the planet — my SpinCTRL subscribers
(+ download 23 Tactics for Content Promotion as a signup bonus).


SUBSCRIBE

###

Want Jerry to speak at your event? Learn more here.

Behind the keyboard:

Jerry Silver is the author of Doctor Spin, a PR blog that's been around for 15+ years. Via his agency Spin Factory, Jerry is advising brands on how to adapt to a 'digital first' world. In 2016, Cision Scandinavia named him "PR Influencer of the Year". Jerry lives in Stockholm, Sweden with his wife Lisah, news anchor and television host, and their three-year-old son, Jack.


Doctor Spin’s comment policy:
“Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people.”
— Eleanor Roosevelt

Reader reactions:

(If you want your profile picture next to your comment, create your own Gravatar here.)

Raj Singh

Spoken like a true 

Reply
Raj Singh

Was going to say – spoken like a true strategist! Thanks for the quick run-through on Edge Rank.

So what about the structure behind allowing employees to post / the implementation of a corporate strategy? It makes sense to me that there should really only be ONE authoritative social media strategist who gets the final say and, if employees have a suggested post, it should be run by that strategist to figure out the details (timing, targeting, value, etc). Could result in “optimization” of EdgeRank positioning. 

Doktor Spinn

Thanks man.

I think that’s a key question. On the one hand you want to create an engaging environment for the fans and that must come first, but on the other hand you don’t want to “gag” your own employees either.

Since a few years back I’ve been constantly recommending a tiered strategy for this. You have official posts and you have individual posts. The official posts are part of the corporate agenda / message calendar. Individuals within the company can then – and should be encouraged to – interact and share, comment and discuss freely as individual.

Why is this?

It’s a question of trust capital. The brand stands for something and should not take that “contract” lightly. And the same goes for the individuals, because they have their trusted networks, too.

It’s not the right of every employee to change corporate strategy whenever they feel like it and it’s not the brand’s right to “use” the individuals trusted networks as they see fit.

So, on a great Facebook Page driven by a big company, you can see employees taking part in the discussion based on their free will to do so. And sometimes, when aligned with the brand strategy, they can act as branded spokespersons.

If nothing else this is the only fair structure to the fans/customers: This is the way for them to know when the people who they’re interacting with are paid or not.

As far as transparency goes, transparency is about being open with your agenda and your intentions, not changing messaging strategy for thousands of your fellow co-workers.

Raj Singh

Spoken like a true 

Reply
Raj Singh

Was going to say – spoken like a true strategist! Thanks for the quick run-through on Edge Rank.

So what about the structure behind allowing employees to post / the implementation of a corporate strategy? It makes sense to me that there should really only be ONE authoritative social media strategist who gets the final say and, if employees have a suggested post, it should be run by that strategist to figure out the details (timing, targeting, value, etc). Could result in “optimization” of EdgeRank positioning. 

Doktor Spinn

Thanks man.

I think that’s a key question. On the one hand you want to create an engaging environment for the fans and that must come first, but on the other hand you don’t want to “gag” your own employees either.

Since a few years back I’ve been constantly recommending a tiered strategy for this. You have official posts and you have individual posts. The official posts are part of the corporate agenda / message calendar. Individuals within the company can then – and should be encouraged to – interact and share, comment and discuss freely as individual.

Why is this?

It’s a question of trust capital. The brand stands for something and should not take that “contract” lightly. And the same goes for the individuals, because they have their trusted networks, too.

It’s not the right of every employee to change corporate strategy whenever they feel like it and it’s not the brand’s right to “use” the individuals trusted networks as they see fit.

So, on a great Facebook Page driven by a big company, you can see employees taking part in the discussion based on their free will to do so. And sometimes, when aligned with the brand strategy, they can act as branded spokespersons.

If nothing else this is the only fair structure to the fans/customers: This is the way for them to know when the people who they’re interacting with are paid or not.

As far as transparency goes, transparency is about being open with your agenda and your intentions, not changing messaging strategy for thousands of your fellow co-workers.