Reading time: 1 minute

This is going to be a short post, so pay close attention, dear readers. I’m going to reveal a favourite trick known to most conversion specialists, but not to the average digital marketer. It’s fun — and a little bit weird, too. We all debate (well, some of us) colours of buttons for maximum conversions. […]

by JERRY SILVER // Twitter, Facebook, Instagram
Digital PR specialist and CEO at Spin Factory

This is going to be a short post, so pay close attention, dear readers.

I’m going to reveal a favourite trick known to most conversion specialists, but not to the average digital marketer. It’s fun — and a little bit weird, too.

We all debate (well, some of us) colours of buttons for maximum conversions. But there are more to getting that oh-so-important click than that …

Here goes:

Here’s To Pointing At Buttons And Forms

You can increase the number of people clicking buttons by simply using visual elements to point at them. I do it myself on the front page of this blog, like this:

Screen Shot 2014-07-05 at 20.41.22

Might you think this is corny? Or something not really worthy of a blog post?

Well, I used to agree with you. But then I started trying it. At first, I just had the three items, public relations, creative marketing and e-commerce there. And then I added the arrow pointing to the opt-in form.

And in this particular case, I saw an average conversion increase of 16% over the three following months compared to the three months before. Now, this could of course also been affected on varying levels of content across these months, but still.

It’s About More Than Just Arrows

Of course, the use of arrows is perhaps the most obvious symbolic application. But you could also use other types of visual pointers, like in this case, where I’ve used LeadPages (affiliate) to create a high-converting landing page and a simple Shutterstock image:

Screen Shot 2014-07-05 at 20.41.07

There’s no actual “pointing” to the opt-in form involved here, but rather a girl looking at the button (see the page live here).

Tricks like these might not make or break your digital strategy. But can you afford to loose those percentages? A few percentage here, a few percentage there, and soon even the most creative online campaign will fail miserably.

Now, do try this at home folks! Please let me know about your experiences in the comments. Or if you just want to tell me I’m a sneaky spin doctor, then that’s okay too.

Never miss a Doctor Spin article again?

Join 4,100+ of the best people on the planet — my SpinCTRL subscribers
(+ download 23 Tactics for Content Promotion as a signup bonus).


SUBSCRIBE

###

Behind the keyboard:

Jerry Silver is the author of Doctor Spin, a PR blog that's been around for 15+ years. His fascination for corporate communication and human psychology runs deep. Via his own agency Spin Factory, every day's spent on coaching people and organizations on how to adapt to a 'digital first' world. In 2016, Cision Scandinavia named him "PR Influencer of the Year". Jerry lives in Stockholm, Sweden with his wife Lisah, journalist and television host, and their two-year-old son, Jack.

Interested in Jerry’s services or speaking engagements? Learn more.

Add your comment:

AydenComunicacion1

:-) is Excellent!
Diseño Web

Reply
Jerry Silfwer

Testing to add a comment.

Reply
Per Axbom

I agree with the psychology here, it really works. One dilemma of course is how this technique also must be adapted to responsive websites. When I view your site in my mobile, the arrow points left (outside the screen) but the content is below it. This begs the need to have multiple images and gaze-directions, based on the width of the viewport. I’d say it’s worth it.

Reply